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Pastoral appointments announced by Bishop Mark Hagemoen

By News

A first round of pastoral appointments, assignments and moves were announced May 21 by Bishop Mark Hagemoen.

Most of the assignments take effect July 31, 2021, with further announcements still to come, the bishop noted in his message to the diocese on May 21, the Feast of St. Eugene de Mazenod.

Announcement from Bishop Hagemoen: Link to PDF

Fr. Mick Fleming, CSsR, who returned to the diocese of Saskatoon in 2019 to serve at St.Mary Parish, Saskatoon, will be taking another assignment with the Redemptorists in the diocese of MacKenzie-Fort Smith, beginning August 2021 .

From July 3, 2021 to Dec. 3, 2021, Fr. Mark Miller, CSsR, will serve as pastor of St. Mary Parish in Saskatoon. He is currently the Edmonton Toronto Regional Coordinator and Vicar-Provincial for the Redemptorist Province of Canada.

Fr. Kevin McGee, will begin serving as pastor of St. Mary Parish in Saskatoon effective Dec. 4, 2021, concluding his time as pastor of St. Augustine, Saskatoon. Fr. McGee will continue to serve as Vicar General for the diocese.

Fr. Darryl Millette, who is currently pastor at Holy Spirit Parish in Saskatoon (since 2015), will serve as associate pastor at the Cathedral of the Holy Family in Saskatoon from July 31 to Dec. 3, 2021, before taking up a new assignment as pastor of St. Augustine Parish in Saskatoon. Fr. Millette will continue to serve as Chancellor for the diocese of Saskatoon, and will continue his ongoing studies in canon law.

Fr. Joseph Salihu is appointed as pastor of Holy Spirit Parish, Saskatoon effective July 31. Fr. Salihu has been serving as pastor at St. Augustine Parish, Humboldt; St. Scholastica Parish, Burr; and Holy Trinity Parish, Pilger, since joining the diocese in 2016.

Fr. Colin Roy is appointed as pastor of St. Augustine Parish in Humboldt effective July 31, 2021. Since 2016, Fr. Roy has served as pastor of St. Michael Parish in Cudworth, Canadian Martyrs Parish in Middle Lake, and St. Benedict Parish in St. Benedict.

Fr. Prince Sarpong, will be joining the diocese of Saskatoon after six years of service in his home archdiocese of Kumasi, Ghana. He is appointed pastor of the parishes of Little Flower in Leader, Sacred Heart in Lancer, and Sacred Heart in Liebenthal, replacing Fr. Madonna-Godwin Aghedo, OP, who is currently serving as parochial administrator of the three parishes.

Fr. Nestor Silva, OMI, is appointed pastor of St. Theresa Parish in Asquith. He will also continue to serve as associate pastor at St. Patrick Parish, Saskatoon, where he has served since 2018.

Fr. Graham Hill, CSsR, is appointed pastor of St. Francis Xavier Parish in Vanscoy. Fr. Hill will also continue to serve as Pastor of Our Lady of Guadalupe, Saskatoon, where he has served since 2016.

Fr. Emmanuel Olusola, has accepted an assignment with the Roman Catholic Diocese of Hamilton, ON. Fr. Olusola has served with the diocese since 2016 as pastor of St. Aloysius Parish in Allan, St. Alphonse Parish in Viscount, and St. Mary Parish, Colonsay, as well as serving as chaplain for Bishop Murray and Bethlehem high schools.

Fr. Deyre Azcuna has concluded his assignment with the diocese of Saskatoon and will be taking another assignment with the Prelature of Batanes, Philippines. Fr. Azcuna has served with the diocese since 2016 as associate pastor of the Cathedral of the Holy Family in Saskatoon.

Vocation updates

Diocesan seminarian Van Tam (Luke) Tran, has started an internship at Our Lady of Lourdes Parish in Saskatoon as of May 1, 2021. He has been studying at Christ the King Seminary in Mission, British Columbia. He will be entering into his third year of theology in 2021.

Sr. April Mireau will make her Profession of Perpetual Vows as a Sister of the Presentation of Mary on the Feast of the Immaculate Heart of Mary, June 12, 2021, at Sacred Heart Cathedral, Prince Albert. A Mass of Thanksgiving will take place June 13, 2021, at the Cathedral of the Holy Family, Saskatoon. (These celebrations will be live-streamed at https://presentationofmary.ca)

Lay woman Crystal Hampson will be making a final Rite of Consecration to a Life of Virginity at 7 p.m. June 9, 2021, at the Cathedral of the Holy Family in Saskatoon. (The celebration will be live-streamed at https://saskatoonmass.com).

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Dying Healed workshop offered in Humboldt

By News

A Dying Healed Workshop will be held at St. Augustine Church Hall in Humboldt, SK, from  10:00 am to 4:30 pm Saturday, May 15, 2021. 

Register by calling Jackie Saretsky of the diocesan Hospital Chaplaincy Office at (306) 659-5839 or e-mail: jsaretsky@rcdos.ca 

This workshop will provide comprehensive education on palliative care / end of life issues and preliminary training for those wishing to provide compassionate and supportive care to those in need, particularly at end-of-life. Cost is $15, which includes a workbook. (Due to current restrictions, attendance is limited, registration is required, and refreshments will not be served.)

Read more about Dying Healed: LINK

Video highlights impact of retired priests

By News

During COVID-19, the annual collection for Priests’ Pension & Retirement Fund relies on mail and online promotion

A video featuring vocation reflections by two retirement-age priests in the Roman Catholic Diocese of Saskatoon was launched April 16 as part of this year’s annual collection for a priests’ pension fund.

Because of COVID-19 restrictions on the number that can gather for worship, the Diocese of Saskatoon Catholic Foundation is relying on mail and electronic distribution — including the video — to raise awareness about the annual collection, and the need to support the Priests’ Pension & Retirement Fund.

View the video:

 

The video is currently being shared by the Catholic Foundation, by parishes in the diocese, through social media, and online – including at the end of the live-streaming of Sunday Mass April 18 celebrated by Bishop Mark Hagemoen at the Cathedral of the Holy Family.

Make a gift to the Priests’ Pension & Retirement Fund online – LINK

Fr. Emile April and Fr. Denis Phaneuf were interviewed for the video. Both of these diocesan priests continue to serve the diocese during their retirement years, with April currently serving as pastor of the Trinité/Trinity pastoral region that includes Vonda, Prud’homme and St. Denis, and Phaneuf assisting at St. Paul Co-Cathedral in Saskatoon — even during the current COVID-19 pandemic.

The video includes reflections on the impact of long-serving priests by Fr. Geoffrey Young, a young priest who serves as pastor at Our Lady of Lourdes in Saskatoon, as well as a message from Bishop Mark Hagemoen.

“The priests of the diocese of Saskatoon depend on one key support source when they retire – and that is our Priest Pension & Retirement Fund which support the St. Joseph’s Mutual Aid Society for our clergy,” he explains. “In addition to this pension fund, our clergy also receive Old Age Pension and Canada Pension Plan amounts. This amount is reduced given that their regular income through their working years is far below the level that most laity earn.”

The bishop adds: “Priests are also encouraged to try to save for their retirement through RSP’s, but this will only be a small amount. By far the most significant contribution to their retirement support comes from the Priest Pension & Retirement Fund.”

In conclusion, the bishop expresses thanks for support and generosity for the 2021 collection for the pension fund. “I also ask you to join with me in prayer for support and healing, as many of our senior clergy – along with many of the elders throughout our province – have been very much affected by the circumstances and isolation caused by the COVID 19 pandemic.”

In a letter sent to Catholic parishioners across the diocese about the pension fund collection, Don Gorsalitz, Executive Director of the Diocese of Saskatoon Catholic Foundation notes: “The examples of people reaching out to support each other and to help our most vulnerable brothers and sisters in need during this challenging time have been profound and heartwarming. Despite the risk, our retired priests too continue to respond to various needs and serve among us, giving themselves generously with dedication and love as they continue to answer the calling of their hearts and life service.”

Gifts can be made online at dscf.ca/priest-pension-fund.  Gifts of cheques can be sent to the following address: Priests’ Pension & Retirement Fund, 123 Nelson Road, Saskatoon SK  S7S 1H1.

 

A message from the Diocese of Saskatoon Catholic Foundation:

Our retired priests have given their lives to us, the people of the Diocese of Saskatoon. They have faithfully led their parish communities, sharing God’s loving and sustaining word and celebrating the sacraments. We are blessed to have these dedicated and holy priests, and these blessings continue to this day. During the COVID-19 pandemic, our senior priests may be among the most vulnerable of all. By now parishioners should have received a letter regarding the 2021 Priests’ Pension & Retirement Fund. We ask that you prayerfully consider making a gift to the Priests’ Pension & Retirement Fund.

For those who prefer to make their gift online using their credit card, please go to dscf.ca/priest-pension-fund/

Gifts of cheques should be sent to the following address: Priests’ Pension & Retirement Fund, 123 Nelson Road, Saskatoon SK, S7S 1H1.

By making a gift online you help us lower administrative costs, and you will receive your charitable tax receipt immediately via a confirmation email. Simply click on the ‘eReceipt’ link embedded in the confirmation email to open your receipt. Please remember to print and save your receipt on your electronic device for your 2021 tax return.

Thank you for your support of our retired priests! 

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Diocesan safeguarding action plan – response to charges being laid against priest

By News

The Roman Catholic Diocese of Saskatoon learned Dec. 16, 2020 that police have laid charges against a priest serving in the diocese, Fr. Anthony Atter, who had been serving as pastor of parishes at Lake Lenore, Annaheim and St. Gregor.  The charges relate to sexual abuse of a minor.

As soon as the diocese learned of these charges, Fr. Anthony Atter was removed from ministry, in accordance with diocesan policy.

The diocese will be cooperating fully with police on this matter, and is unable to respond to questions and comments on the case at this time, while it is under investigation and/or before the courts.

“I am sure like all of you, my heart sank upon hearing of another accusation of abuse by one of our priests. This despite all the work and the great steps we have taken over the last while to create safer church communities and eliminate all forms and threats of abuse,” said Bishop Mark Hagemoen in a message to the diocese Dec. 17.

“I realize that each time the terrible crime of sex abuse is reported, victims and their families are wounded again, the vast majority of faithful priests bow their heads in shame, and sincere Catholics, Christians and people of good will, experience shock, sorrow, anger and righteous indignation.

“I wish very much that I could say to you that because of our efforts there will be no more accusations. However, what I can and will say strongly is – as your bishop, I join with the many lay women and men who have contributed hard work and much time to developing our safeguarding action plan to continue our efforts at eliminating all forms of abuse!

“I also commit to honouring complainants, victims and their families, the accused, and in this case the parishes of the communities of Lake Lenore, Annahiem, and St. Gregor – as well as all of our clergy and lay faithful throughout our diocese and beyond – to not jump to conclusions and allow our legitimate frustration and anger to overwhelm the commitment to respect and support the investigative processes of the police and our own diocese to determine guilt or innocence, and the proper response.”

Bishop Hagemoen concluded: “This current allegation of another case of abuse involving one of our families is an occasion to again affirm our commitment to respond to all those who have been victimized and hurt by any person acting in the name of the Church. The Diocese of Saskatoon stands in solidarity with any and all victims and commits to being an instrument of reconciliation and healing. It also commits to building safer churches and stronger communities: the theme of our safeguarding action plan. I join with all our diocese in sharing both pain and strong resolution.”

Dec. 16 Media Release: PDF

Policies and commitments regarding safeguarding – including sexual abuse – can be found on the diocesan website at https://rcdos.ca/our-diocese/safe-environment/safer-church/

Safeguarding Action Plan

As part of an ongoing commitment to safeguarding children, youth and the vulnerable in its churches, the Roman Catholic Diocese of Saskatoon has published a Safer Church, Stronger Communities safeguarding action plan featuring 20 commitments aimed at preventing and responding to abuse by clergy or others in the church.

Download the Safer Churches, Stronger Communities safeguarding action plan: PDF

Reporting abuse: Contact information

The four-page Safer Churches, Stronger Communities action plan reflects the recent work of a diocesan Safeguarding Committee (consisting of eight lay Catholics and one diocesan priest), chaired by Brenda FitzGerald.

The Safeguarding Committee was established by Saskatoon Bishop Mark Hagemoen to review and update the diocese’s long-standing policies related to safeguarding and abuse.

As part of its work, the diocesan Safeguarding Committee has reviewed and updated diocesan policies for ensuring safe church environments, focused on increasing awareness about the impact of sexual abuse on survivors, and clearly outlined steps for handling allegations of serious misconduct — including sexual abuse – by clergy or others working in the church.

 

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Safeguarding Action Plan announced

By News

As part of an ongoing commitment to safeguarding children, youth and the vulnerable in its churches, the Roman Catholic Diocese of Saskatoon has published a Safer Church, Stronger Communities safeguarding action plan featuring 20 commitments aimed at preventing and responding to abuse by clergy or others in the church. Copies of the plan will be distributed to parishes beginning at the Cathedral of the Holy Family March 14-15 and will be handed out in parish bulletins at other parishes across the diocese in the weeks ahead.

Download the Safer Churches, Stronger Communities safeguarding action plan: PDF (updated in July 2021)

Reporting abuse: Contact information

The four-page Safer Churches, Stronger Communities action plan reflects the recent work of a diocesan Safeguarding Committee (consisting of eight lay Catholics and one diocesan priest), chaired by Brenda FitzGerald.

The Safeguarding Committee was established by Saskatoon Bishop Mark Hagemoen two years ago, to review and update the diocese’s long-standing policies related to safeguarding and abuse.

“We have all seen the news articles about cases and allegations from around the world about sexual abuse by clergy, past and present — with this report we wanted to explain how our own local Catholic community is responding to this important issue,” says Safeguarding Committee Chair Brenda FitzGerald. “The bottom line is that we are committed to do all we can to make our churches safe for all, and to heal the hurt caused by the crime of sexual abuse.”

She adds: ““Our diocesan Safeguarding Committee is made up of members of our church community from all walks of life. Each and every one of us are committed to safeguarding children and vulnerable persons in our church environments, and to responding with compassion and sensitivity to anyone who comes forward with allegations of serious misconduct, including sexual abuse.”

In the new four-page action plan, as well as in video updates and elsewhere, Bishop Mark Hagemoen has invited anyone who has experienced abuse in the church to come forward, and has apologized for the hurt and trauma that survivors have experienced.

“The violation and victimization by any members of the church, and most specifically any of its clergy, of the young and vulnerable by leaders and pastors of the faithful whose priority is to embody by their lives the truth and way of the Gospel of Jesus Christ is a tragedy,” says Hagemoen. “We must bring all of this to the light, and find our way forward finding the same mind, heart, and way as Christ Jesus.”

As part of its work, the diocesan Safeguarding Committee has reviewed and updated diocesan policies for ensuring safe church environments, focused on increasing awareness about the impact of sexual abuse on survivors, and clearly outlined steps for handling allegations of serious misconduct — including sexual abuse – by clergy or others working in the church.

Training and updates on the issue and on diocesan policies are being provided to leaders and parishioners across the diocese, and have included in-service sessions for clergy and parish leaders, video updates to the faithful about the policies by Bishop Hagemoen and Brenda FitzGerald, and training sessions open to all interested in November/December 2019. The 20-point safeguarding action plan  is the latest step in the diocesan effort to clearly inform the faithful and the community at large about  commitments to safeguarding children and vulnerable persons from abuse.

In addition, Bishop Hagemoen has recently launched an Historic Case Review Committee, chaired by Bob Loran, working independently of the bishop’s office. This committee will review historical cases involving the abuse of children and vulnerable adults by clergy in the dioceese, including those who have died, to determine whether such cases were handled appropriately. “I look forward to receiving the results of this new committee’s work, and to communicating their recommendations and our response in the near future,” said Hagemoen.

“It is my goal to hold the bar very high in assuring that all our churches are safe and respectful communities,” says the bishop. “We are taking this issue seriously.”

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Our Pastoral Plan: “Proclaim Christ and God’s Kingdom”

By News

Bishop Mark Hagemoen recently launched a Pastoral Plan for the Roman Catholic Diocese of Saskatoon focused on the mission of proclaiming Jesus Christ.

“Evangelization must permeate everything we do — everything we do proclaims Christ and God’s Kingdom,” said Bishop Hagemoen, announcing the promulgation and rolling out of the new Pastoral Plan at an annual Administration Day for the diocese.

The bishop challenged Pastors, Parish Life Directors, ministry leaders and parish representatives from across the diocese of Saskatoon to use the proposed three-year plan as a way to reflect upon strengths, gaps, and new directions.

The mission statement “Proclaim Christ and God’s Kingdom” is identified in the Pastoral Plan, along with six priorities — beginning first and foremost with: “Draw People into a Deepening Intimacy with the Lord.

“Whether it is a parish of five families, or 15,000, the task and the mission of Christ is fundamentally the same,” he said. “Ultimately, everything must involve  the call to evangelization.”

 

 

Greg Chatlain, Director of Education for Greater Saskatoon Catholic Schools, was one of the facilitators for the eight-month planning process undertaken by the Diocesan Pastoral Council (which includes representatives from parishes of all sizes from across the diocese, as well as pastors, religious, and other leaders). “What you are seeing today is the result of many hours of wrestling and discussion, and of challenging each other to come up with those things that we all need to work on together,” Chatlain said at the Administration Day launch.

Reason for developing a Pastoral Plan

Bishop Hagemoen described why the first task that he gave to the newly-formed Diocesan Pastoral Council was to discern the needs and challenges facing the Church, and to produce a Pastoral Plan for the diocese and its parishes.

“As I travelled the diocese I was hearing different expressions from the parishes that we have in the diocese of Saskatoon — dreams, hopes, concerns — as you can probably guess, some of the concerns especially in the rural area were around issues of viability,” explained the bishop. “At the same time, Saskatoon has had the highest growth rate of any city in Canada, which has an impact on our parishes and communities, so there is need for planning for growth.”

In both cases, one cannot just plan for improving viability or for growth, without a vision, goals and priorities, he said. “Especially in the Church, especially in ministry, if it doesn’t come from the mission of Christ and the Church, then all we would be doing is enlarging our maintenance.”

Bishop Hagemoen cited the insight he heard from a Parish Pastoral Council chair at a small rural parish: “Bishop Mark, we love our church, we put a lot of work into our church and we will continue to do that, but we are exceedingly concerned that we are putting 95 per cent of our effort into maintaining our building and very little into the mission,. We know that if we keep doing that, we won’t last, we will die… we want to, and we need to, engage in mission.”

The six priorities/ goals

Click on each goal for more detail

  1. Draw People into a Deepening Intimacy with the Lord!  –  Supporting a deepening friendship and intimacy with Jesus Christ
  2. Make Every Sunday Matter  – Focusing on our Sunday celebrations
  3. “Embrace Your Priesthood”  –  Discerning God’s call to each person to share in the mission and life of the Lord
  4. Build and Support Family and Community  – Strengthening and supporting families and marriages, vocations support
  5. Promote the Healing Journey in the Lord – Healing, growth, serving, ongoing conversion
  6. Move from Maintenance to Mission. – Helping parishes proclaim Christ in everything

 

“We are only beginning — the coming months will see the rolling out of this,” Bishop Hagemoen said of the Pastoral Plan. “This is not meant to be a quick fix or a quick experience, check off a couple of things — that is not what it is meant to be.”

He added that he takes his responsibility as bishop seriously, and that he sees the plan as a way to move forward and deepen engagement with the mission of proclaiming Christ and the Kingdom of God, “I am building on the faith life of a great diocese,” he said.

Next steps:

At the diocesan level, the Pastoral Plan will assist in moving forward in ministries and programs to assist parishes and provide resources. As next steps for parishes, the bishop proposed the following:

  • Personally and prayerfully review and consider the Pastoral Plan, the mission and goals
  • Review and discussion at parish level
  • Review by parish and finance councils; parish ministry people; general parishioners
  • Possible discussion at deanery level
  • Determine parish priorities/tasks given strengths and gaps
  • Seek supports and resources

Working poster outlining the Pastoral Plan’s mission and goals: PDF of poster

 

Covenant of Care – Safeguarding and Healing from Abuse UPDATES

By News

VIDEO UPDATE Covenant of Care: Responding to the Sexual Abuse Crisis:

“The Roman Catholic Diocese of Saskatoon is committed to providing safe and respectful church communities and to protecting people from abuse and harm that results from abuse.” – Brenda FitzGerald, Chair, Diocesan Committee for the Covenant of Care and Serious Misconduct Protocol.

Transcript – Brenda FitzGerald: CLICK for PDF

 

VIDEO UPDATE from Bishop Mark Hagemoen:

“We need to listen to and support victims and survivors. This is the perspective from which all our efforts begin.” Bishop Mark Hagemoen, Roman Catholic Diocese of Saskatoon.

Transcript of Update from Bishop Mark Hagemoen: CLICK for PDF

Other Updates:

Message from Bishop Mark Hagemoen about an episode of The Fifth Estate that aired on Nov. 17, 2019: UPDATE re: Covenant of Care and CBC program

Nov. 8, 2019 survey response from the Diocese of Saskatoon to The Fifth Estate television program about historical review of cases, and publication of names of persons who are “credibly accused” of sexual abuse: Diocesan RESPONSE

The Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops (CCCB) has also posted an update on how the bishops are implementing guidelines on protecting minors from sexual abuse. The statement also addresses the question of publishing names of persons who have been “credibly accused” of sexual abuse, but not criminally charged and/or convicted: PDF of the CCCB Statement

PDF – Protecting Minors From Sexual Abuse – CCCB National Guidelines

The Roman Catholic Diocese of Saskatoon is committed to providing safe and respectful church communities and creating healthy ministerial relationships, and to protecting people from abuse and the harm that results.

Training sessions

Training sessions related to diocesan Covenant of Care and safeguarding policies, abuse prevention and response were held at two locations: Tuesday, Nov. 26 at St. Augustine Parish in Humboldt and Tuesday, Dec. 3 at Cathedral of the Holy Family in Saskatoon.

Clergy, parish staff, Catholic Pastoral Centre staff, Parish Coordinators of Care, and volunteers working with children, youth or vulnerable adults were invited to attend one of the workshops, either in person, or via webinar conferencing. Other volunteers were also welcome to attend. There was no cost. The workshops were conducted by Theresa Campbell, Director of Operations at the Catholic Pastoral Centre and Lorie Harrison, Registered Professional Counsellor at Legacy Ridge – Trauma Recovery & Resource Centre.

 

“Proclaim Christ and God’s Kingdom Today” – Pastoral Plan launched for diocese

By Bishop Mark Hagemoen's blog, News

Bishop Mark Hagemoen recently launched a Pastoral Plan for the Roman Catholic Diocese of Saskatoon focused on the mission of proclaiming Jesus Christ.

“Evangelization must permeate everything we do — everything we do proclaims Christ and God’s Kingdom,” said Bishop Hagemoen, announcing the promulgation and rolling out of the new Pastoral Plan at an annual Administration Day for the diocese.

The bishop challenged Pastors, Parish Life Directors, ministry leaders and parish representatives from across the diocese of Saskatoon to use the proposed three-year plan as a way to reflect upon strengths, gaps, and new directions.

The mission statement “Proclaim Christ and God’s Kingdom Today” is identified in the Pastoral Plan, along with six priorities — beginning first and foremost with: “Draw People into a Deepening Intimacy with the Lord.

“Whether it is a parish of five families, or 15,000, the task and the mission of Christ is fundamentally the same,” he said. “Ultimately, everything must involve  the call to evangelization.”

 

 

Greg Chatlain, Director of Education for Greater Saskatoon Catholic Schools, was one of the facilitators for the eight-month planning process undertaken by the Diocesan Pastoral Council (which includes representatives from parishes of all sizes from across the diocese, as well as pastors, religious, and other leaders). “What you are seeing today is the result of many hours of wrestling and discussion, and of challenging each other to come up with those things that we all need to work on together,” Chatlain said at the Administration Day launch.

Reason for developing a Pastoral Plan

Bishop Hagemoen described why the first task that he gave to the newly-formed Diocesan Pastoral Council was to discern the needs and challenges facing the Church, and to produce a Pastoral Plan for the diocese and its parishes.

“As I travelled the diocese I was hearing different expressions from the parishes that we have in the diocese of Saskatoon — dreams, hopes, concerns — as you can probably guess, some of the concerns especially in the rural area were around issues of viability,” explained the bishop. “At the same time, Saskatoon has had the highest growth rate of any city in Canada, which has an impact on our parishes and communities, so there is need for planning for growth.”

In both cases, one cannot just plan for improving viability or for growth, without a vision, goals and priorities, he said. “Especially in the Church, especially in ministry, if it doesn’t come from the mission of Christ and the Church, then all we would be doing is enlarging our maintenance.”

Bishop Hagemoen cited the insight he heard from a Parish Pastoral Council chair at a small rural parish: “Bishop Mark, we love our church, we put a lot of work into our church and we will continue to do that, but we are exceedingly concerned that we are putting 95 per cent of our effort into maintaining our building and very little into the mission,. We know that if we keep doing that, we won’t last, we will die… we want to, and we need to, engage in mission.”

The six priorities/ goals

Click on each goal for more detail

  1. Draw People into a Deepening Intimacy with the Lord!  –  Supporting a deepening friendship and intimacy with Jesus Christ
  2. Make Every Sunday Matter  – Focusing on our Sunday celebrations
  3. “Embrace Your Priesthood”  –  Discerning God’s call to each person to share in the mission and life of the Lord
  4. Build and Support Family and Community  – Strengthening and supporting families and marriages, vocations support
  5. Promote the Healing Journey in the Lord – Healing, growth, serving, ongoing conversion
  6. Move from Maintenance to Mission. – Helping parishes proclaim Christ in everything

 

“We are only beginning — the coming months will see the rolling out of this,” Bishop Hagemoen said of the Pastoral Plan. “This is not meant to be a quick fix or a quick experience, check off a couple of things — that is not what it is meant to be.”

He added that he takes his responsibility as bishop seriously, and that he sees the plan as a way to move forward and deepen engagement with the mission of proclaiming Christ and the Kingdom of God, “I am building on the faith life of a great diocese,” he said.

Next steps:

At the diocesan level, the Pastoral Plan will assist in moving forward in ministries and programs to assist parishes and provide resources. As next steps for parishes, the bishop proposed the following:

  • Personally and prayerfully review and consider the Pastoral Plan, the mission and goals
  • Review and discussion at parish level
  • Review by parish and finance councils; parish ministry people; general parishioners
  • Possible discussion at deanery level
  • Determine parish priorities/tasks given strengths and gaps
  • Seek supports and resources

Working poster outlining the Pastoral Plan’s mission and goals: PDF of poster

 

Bishop Mark Hagemoen Blog – Summer 2019 Trip to the West Coast

By Bishop Mark Hagemoen's blog, News

Trip to Garibaldi Highlands and Black Tusk with graduates from St. Therese Institute of Faith and Mission Apostolic Year

By Bishop Mark Hagemoen, Bishop of Saskatoon

Six graduates from St. Therese, Brunojoined myself and several others from the Archdiocese of Vancouveron a spectacular one-day 27-kilometre hike through Garibaldi Park and Black Tusk mountain this summer. The area is utterly spectacular and beautiful. It is also a great introduction to prairie people of the mountainous playground of British Columbia and specifically, the southwest coast mountains.

The six graduates from St. Therese were: Rheal Chartier (St. Boniface Archdiocese, Manitoba); Veronica and Dominique Skuban (St. Paul Diocese, Alberta); Alison Fox (Calgary Diocese, Alberta); Kaitlyn Deck (Saskatoon Diocese, Saskatchewan); Peter Van Leeuwen (Archdiocese of Vancouver, British Columbia). Joining us were: Douglas Pham and his fiancé, Julia Rumpel and Beverly Ng of Vancouver; Josh Dupuis (just moved from Saskatoon to Vancouver); and Rev. Gary Franken of the Archdiocese of Vancouver.

The area features vast and majestic topography of meadow highlands, as well as spectacular ridges and peaks – many which fall off into seemingly empty abysses.

Josh Dupuis, Fr. Gary Franken, Rheal Chartier, Alison Fox, and +Mark Hagemoen on ascent toward Black Tusk Peak, in the distance.

Peter Van Leeuwen, Rheal Chartier, and Fr. Gary Franken take a needed break in the scree as they ascend the ridge.

Rheal Chartier is thinking: “Gee, there’s nothing this high in Manitoba! What am I doing up here?!!

A quick selfie looking backwards on the ridge approaching the Black Tusk.

The views get increasingly spectacular of the glacial meadows and highlands around Garibaldi Lake as we ascend the ridge.

Peter Van Leauwan carefully watches his next step!! Black Tusk Peak, in the distance.

The group celebrates at the top of the Tusk!

Working our way back down the chimneys.

Josh Dupuis, Fr. Gary Franken, Peter Van Leeuwen, and myself climbing up and down the final ‘chimney accesses’ up the cinder cone of Black Tusk.

The Tusk is both alluring and daunting as its viewed against the sky.

Getting ready to celebrate the Holy Eucharist in the upper meadows following the descent.

A truly epic day with a great group!

Visit to Our Lady Queen of Peace Dominican Monastery in Upper Squamish Valley

The following day we had the opportunity to visit the Dominican religious community of cloister religions women at Our Lady Queen of Peace. The community was formerly established at their home in Upper Squamish Valley in August 2012, having arrived 12 years earlier and working to establish their new community in the Archdiocese of Vancouver in 1999.

The current Dominican community of religious women at Our Lady Queen of Peace.

The spectacular view of the Tantalus Range from the Chapel at the Monastery.

For further information about the community, please visit: www.dominicannunsbc.ca

Other hiking in the area during the trip to the West Coast

It was great to continue to experience other wilderness hiking during the visit to the West Coast. All of these places I have spent much time at during my previous years living in the region, both during my youth and my 23 years as a priest in the Archdiocese of Vancouver.

View of the Howe Sound Crest Ridge as viewed looking east from Gambier Island.

Gambier Lake, Gambier Island

Views approaching Brunswick Mountain, Cypress Provincial Park overlooking Howe Sound.

The approach and climb,  and the views from Brunswick Mountain are spectacular. Amazing to still see snow on the back slopes in late August – indicating that the west coast had a more moderate summer than previous years.

The meadow slopes in the upper ridge between Brunswick and Harvey Mountains.

Peaks to the south include Mount Harveyand The Lions– the most famous mountains viewed from Vancouver overlooking the North Shore Mountains.

View towards Mount Harvey – the next destination to the south of Brunswick Mountain.

View from Mount Harvey to The Lions.

Looking up from the base of Mount Harvey at the end of the hike.

Eagle Ridgeover Buntzen and Coquitlam Lakes.

Another opportunity to enjoy a great – although hot – day with my nephew, Matthew Hagemoen. Here we have just had a feed of mountain blueberries. They are quite abundant this time of year.

Views from Mount Beautifullooking along Eagle Ridge.

View from “The Pulpit” overlooking Coquitlam Lake.

View up Swan Falls Creekalong the trail descending the ridge.

Dinner with my father, Eric Hagemoenat his cabin at Shuswap Lake.

Rainbow over the Shuswap– a great sign during a wonderful respite.

 

 

 

I have been very blessed to have this time in the mountains in the south-west region of British Columbia, my home for many years. I return refreshed and renewed to the Diocese of Saskatoon, ready to receive further the blessings of the great Prairies and its peoples!

                                                            In Christ,      

+Mark HagemoenBishop Mark Hagemoen Blog – Summer 2019 Trip to the West Coast

Rooted in Christ