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Kiply Lukan Yaworski

Schedule announced for visit of Pope Francis to Canada July 24-27 – diocese participation underway

By News

The Vatican has released additional details regarding the Papal Visit to Canada, July 24-29, 2022.

View Schedule – LINK

Pope Francis will visit a residential school site near Edmonton, as well as the Lac Ste. Anne pilgrimage. (Photo courtesy of CCCB)

The Pope’s visit will provide an opportunity for him to listen and dialogue with Indigenous Peoples, to express his heartfelt closeness and to address the impact of residential schools in Canada. The papal visit will also provide an opportunity for the shepherd of the world’s 1.2 billion Catholics to connect with the Catholic community in Canada.

The Holy Father will travel within Alberta (based in Edmonton) from July 24-27, followed by a visit to Quebec City and Ste. Anne-de-Beaupré, July 27-29.

Pope Francis will visit Iqaluit, Nunavut the afternoon of July 29 before returning to Rome.

BISHOP HAGEMOENResponding to newly-released details about the papal visit schedule, Bishop Mark Hagemoen says that plans are underway for a bus trip to Edmonton from Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish, as well as for a Saskatoon event on July 26 , held in conjunction with the papal visit, with more details to be announced soon: LINK to Bishop Hagemoen’s letter to the diocese.
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IN OUR DIOCESE – Events and plans for the pilgrimage of reconciliation and healing during Pope Francis’s visit to Canada: LINK to more information from coordinators in the Roman Catholic Diocese of Saskatoon.
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DONATIONS – To support a Residential School Survivor to attend, to support the Catholic TRC Healing Response and/or to support the papal visit, see the Diocese of Saskatoon Catholic Foundation: dscf.ca/papal-visit-2022.
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Highlights of the program announced by the Vatican include:

July 24, 2022

The Holy Father will arrive in Edmonton, Alberta on Sunday, July 24. Following a brief airport ceremony, the 85-year-old pontiff will take the remainder of the day to rest.

July 25, 2022

On Monday, July 25, Pope Francis will visit Maskwacis, home to the former Ermineskin Residential School, one of the largest residential school sites in Canada. The Holy Father will join former residential school students from across the country as part of a formal program. Alberta is home to the largest number of former residential schools in Canada.

Later in the day, the pontiff will visit Sacred Heart Church of the First Peoples, a National Indigenous church in downtown Edmonton. Following extensive restoration after a devastating fire in 2020, the parish will re-open its doors after using a nearby school the last several years to offer hospitality, spiritual care and supportive outreach programs serving a diverse urban Indigenous community. This will be an invitation-only event.

July 26, 2022

Tuesday, July 26 is the feast of St. Anne, grandmother of Jesus, a day of particular reverence for Indigenous Catholics and often the focus of pilgrimage in various parts of the country. In an event that will be open to the public, the Holy Father will celebrate an open-air Mass at Commonwealth Stadium in Edmonton. The facility can accommodate up to 65,000 attendees for a program that will incorporate Indigenous traditions as part of the gathering.

In the early evening, the Holy Father will travel to Lac Ste. Anne, the site of an annual pilgrimage that welcomes tens of thousands of Indigenous participants from throughout Canada and the United States each year. Programming will be offered throughout the day leading up to the Holy Father’s participation in a prayer service.

July 27, 2022

The Holy Father will depart Edmonton for Quebec City on Wednesday, July 27.

Upon arrival in Quebec, the Pontiff will visit La Citadelle, where he will take part in private meetings. Pope Francis, as both a spiritual leader and head of state, will also offer a public address.

For events in Quebec City, the public is also invited to participate at a dedicated area on the Plains of Abraham, where there will be opportunities on July 27 and 28 for Indigenous cultural expression as well as the chance to view papal events on large screens. The detailed program of activities on the Plains is being developed with Indigenous and community partners.

July 28, 2022

Pope Francis will travel to Sainte-Anne-de-Beaupré Thursday, July 28, where he will celebrate Mass at one of the oldest and most popular pilgrimage sites in North America, drawing more than a million visitors to the site (including annual Indigenous pilgrimages) each year. Organizers anticipate between 10,000 and 15,000 guests may attend with space for guests both inside and outside the basilica.

Later in the day, the HolyFather will meet with bishops, priests, seminarians, consecrated men and women as well as those who work in various church ministries, as is customary with most papal visits. The pope will have the remainder of the evening for rest while a dinner focused on friendship and ongoing dialogue will bring together Indigenous leaders from Eastern Canada and representatives of the Catholic Bishops of Canada.

July 29, 2022

Following a private meeting with members of his own religious order (Society of Jesus) Friday, July 29, Pope Francis will meet with Indigenous leaders from Eastern Canada before departing for Iqaluit, where he will spend the afternoon in a private meeting with residential school survivors before attending a public community event hosted by Inuit.

The Holy Father will depart for Rome from Iqaluit in the early evening of July 29.

Schedule for visit: PDF

Drawing on the theme, “Walking Together”, the Holy Father’s journey of reconciliation, healing and hope includes visits to a former residential school, Indigenous pilgrimage sites, two public Masses and a mix of private and public events. There will be tickets available (free) for a limited number of events, all of which will be broadcast and accessible via livestream.

To learn more:  www.papalvisit.ca (English) and www.visitepapale.ca (French).

Please continue to pray for the health of Pope Francis and for all those engaged in the ongoing healing and reconciliation journey.

Catholic bishops welcome announcement of program for papal visit

Media release from CCCB communications

[Ottawa – June 23, 2022] – Canada’s Catholic Bishops welcomed the June 23 announcement from the Holy See providing further details of the itinerary of Pope Francis’ historic visit to Canada, July 24 to 29, 2022. This will be the fourth papal visit to Canada and the first since Saint John Paul II’s journey in 2002.

The Holy Father’s pilgrimage will focus on Indigenous healing and reconciliation while also providing the shepherd of the world’s 1.2 billion Catholics an opportunity to encounter the faithful in Canada. Due to his advanced age and limitations, it is expected that participation by Pope Francis at public events will be limited to approximately one hour.

General coordinator of the papal visit to Canada, Archbishop Richard Smith, remarked on the release of the program: “We know that the Holy Father was deeply moved by his encounter with Indigenous Peoples in Rome earlier this year, and that he hopes to build on the important dialogue that took place. We pray this pilgrimage will serve as another meaningful step in the long journey of healing, reconciliation and hope.”

The visit, drawing on the theme of “Walking Together”, will include a combination of public and private events, with an emphasis on Indigenous participation throughout the visit.

Ticketing (free) for public events will be announced in the coming days.

A volunteer portal can be accessed at papalvisit.ca or visitepapale.ca for those wishing to share their time and talents as part of the historic visit.

The papal visit planning team will work closely with Indigenous partners as well as federal, provincial and municipal levels of government to dialogue and co-ordinate the significant logistical challenges associated with a visit of this scope and magnitude.

CCCB President, Bishop Raymond Poisson, commented on the efforts: “So many people are working diligently to organize this very busy schedule for the Holy Father and participants. We pray for the health of Pope Francis and also that his pastoral visit to Canada will bring reconciliation and hope to all those who will accompany our shepherd on this historic journey.”

Those interested in learning more about the Papal Visit to Canada can find the latest updates at: www.papalvisit.ca (English) and www.visitepapale.ca (French).

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About the Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops – The Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops (CCCB) is the national assembly of the Bishops of Canada. It was founded in 1943 and officially recognized by the Holy See in 1948.

Related: Catholic TRC Healing Response (information and to donate)

Related: Pope Francis coming to Canada

Related: Saskatchewan Catholic bishops respond to news of papal visit

Related: Archbishop Bolen and Chief Delorme call for new ways of  “Walking With Your Neighbour”

Related: Manitoba Métis praise Pope Francis for listening

Related: Indigenous leaders see “fresh tracks” in hunt for healing

Related: Pope apologizes for treatment of Indigenous People, promises to visit

Related: Text of Papal Apology

Related: Indigenous People want truth about past, partnership for future

 

 

 

On April 1, 2022, Pope Francis apologized for the Catholic Church’s role in Canada’s residential school system. The Holy Father expressed “sorrow and shame” for the abuse and lack of respect for Indigenous identities, culture and spiritual values in the residential school system. (Image courtesy of Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops)

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Celebrating the 100th anniversary of St. Michael Church at Tramping Lake, SK

By Bishop Mark Hagemoen's blog

Those in attendance for the 100th anniversary celebration of St. Michael Parish included (l-r) Tramping Lake Pastor Fr. Greg Roth, Saskatoon Bishop Mark Hagemoen and Msgr. Raymond Senger, who grew up at Tramping Lake. (Photos by Kiply Lukan Yaworski)

By Kiply Lukan Yaworski, Catholic Saskatoon News

Parishioners, former parishioners and their families gathered together June 11, 2022 to celebrate the 100th anniversary of St. Michael Catholic Church, constructed in 1922 at Tramping Lake, in the heart of St. Joseph’s Colony.

Bishop Mark Hagemoen celebrated Mass to open the celebration, joined by St. Michael pastor Fr. Gregory Roth of Unity, Fr. Edward Gibney of Biggar, Fr. Santhosh Thekkekulam, VC, of Wilkie, and retired diocesan priest Msgr. Raymond Senger, who is originally from Tramping Lake. Fr. Dan Yasinski of Kerrobert was also in attendance.

Music ministry was led by Marie Volk, with a choir that included many returning community and family members. Cantor was James Nestmann, and Donalda Senger and Alicia Simon were readers for the Eucharistic celebration for the Solemnity of the Holy Trinity.

 

 

 

 

 

 

                      “This is indeed a beautiful church,” said Bishop Mark Hagemoen, as he joined the community in celebrating and thanking God for 100 years of faith and service. “On the Feast of the Trinity we celebrate how God is made manifest to us,” the bishop said. God the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit are revealed in the readings for the solemnity, he said, and also in the life, mission and ministry of the parish over the past 100 years. “It is a deep relationship, not merely a membership.”

The theme of gratitude and mission also echoed in the prayers of intention during the anniversary Mass, presented by Alicia Simon.

“Let us give thanks that for the past century, the St. Michael’s Church spire has encouraged us to look heavenward. Under the shelter of its steeple, the bell tolled in mourning and sadness, pealed happily, sharing joy and gladness, and rang with the call to community prayer. Under its roof many found inspiration to continue life’s journey, and others celebrated joyous occasions,” she prayed.

“Today we remember and pray for all who had the foresight and charity to offer prayers, time, talents and finances to build, furnish and maintain this building, providing a place where all may come to adore, praise and grow in the love of God,” continued the community prayers, which went on to call upon on the intercession of both St. Michael, the patron saint of the parish, and St. Joseph, the patron saint of the historic St. Joseph’s Colony, established in 1905 by a group of German Catholics from Russia.

 

 

    

 

Although the present St. Michael Church building was built a century ago in 1922, the parish was first established 16 years earlier when the colony itself began, those in attendance heard during history of the parish presented by Gwen Barschel at a banquet in the community hall that followed the anniversary Mass.

In those early days of the parish, Mass was celebrated in homes, in a tent and then in a sod church built in 1906, before a wooden church building was constructed in 1910. In 1921, the pastor of the Tramping Lake congregation, Fr. Theodore Krist, OMI, led the community in planning for a new church in the Village of Tramping Lake, with construction starting June 15, 1922, and the first Mass celebrated in the new building on Christmas Eve, 1922.

The new Romanesque-style church building was 135 by 50 feet – the largest brick church in St. Joseph’s Colony, situated at the colony’s geographical centre, Barschel noted. The cost to build was between $40,000 and $48,000 – the equivalent cost today would be about $685,000 to $822,000, she said.

“All built by volunteers, it is a church still admired far and wide for its beauty,” Barschel said.

Over the years, construction and improvements continued, with the completion of the steeple, exterior finishing in white stucco, interior painting and the addition of statues, artwork and a huge 22- by 11-foot  altar, built along the back wall of the sanctuary, designed in Italian Renaissance style using Italian white marble, flanked by pedestals capped with Belgian black marble. One-third life size stations of the cross were purchased in 1970 from St. Joseph Church in Winnipeg, and brought to St. Michael’s in a parishioner’s half-ton truck.

The 100th anniversary program also included greetings from Tramping Lake Mayor Christine Lang, and representatives of the Catholic Women’s League and Knights of Columbus, before parishioners and visitors were invited to share memories and messages via an “open microphone.”

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Video of 100th Anniversary Mass and Presentations:

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St. Paul’s Hospital Distinguished Service Awards presented to protective services officers who handled grenade incident

By Bishop Mark Hagemoen's blog

St. Paul’s Hospital in Saskatoon recently recognized the outstanding actions of four protective services staff members who responded quickly, calmly and bravely to a frightening incident earlier this year when a person entering the hospital pulled out a grenade.

In a noon-hour ceremony June 8, Saskatoon Bishop Mark Hagemoen presented officers Candice Nolan, Bryan Melnychuk, Lee Cowles and Amra Martin with a St. Paul’s Hospital Distinguished Service Award for their actions in handling a potentially life-threatening situation.

St. Paul’s Hospital Executive Director Tracy Muggli described the incident of Feb. 14, 2022, when – without knowing if the grenade was live or inert – hospital protective services officers Candice Nolan and Bryan Melnychuk quickly restrained the man who pulled out the grenade, and removed the device. Officers Lee Cowles and Amra Martin also responded to provide assistance before Saskatoon Police Services arrived. In the end, it was determined the device was inert, but there was no way to know that at the time.

“With their immediate and brave response, the officers kept all of us safe from a potential harm that presented itself,” said Muggli, expressing her gratitude to the officers for their bravery and commitment.

The four members of the hospital’s protective services staff were also recently awarded the Saskatoon Police Chief’s Community Service Award for their swift action.

Read the full news report: LINK

Bishop Mark Hagemoen noted how St. Paul’s Hospital is dedicated to the health and the care of the whole person “inspired by Christ and the religious faith of the community.” Thanking the four officers for their heroism, the bishop also acknowledged so many others at the Catholic hospital “who are sharing in the shepherding role of Christ.”

Bishop Mark Hagemoen presented St. Paul’s Hospital Distinguished Service Awards to protective services officers Bryan Melychuk, Lee Cowles, and Candice Nolin. Ross Fowler (right) accepted the award on behalf of their colleague Amra Martin, who was not present at the June 8 celebration. (Photo by Kiply Lukan Yaworski, Catholic Saskatoon News)

 

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St. Mary Catholic school Treaty 6 medal installation

By Bishop Mark Hagemoen's blog

By Kiply Lukan Yaworski, Catholic Saskatoon News

Students, staff and special guests gathered at St. Mary’s Catholic school in Saskatoon June 8 for an outdoor Treaty 6 medal celebration, featuring drumming, song, art and student reflections and presentations about the history, meaning and importance of treaties.

Read the full news report: LINK

In his address to students, Bishop Mark Hagemoen of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Saskatoon described how when he was a bishop in the north, an Indigenous artist gave him a beaded cross, which he often wears alongside a crucifix made in a European style. Wearing the two together has become for him a sign of the “right relationship” of love, harmony and respect that God wants for all people.

Working toward the installation of a replica of the Treaty 6 medal has been a learning journey for the school, said St. Mary Principal Andrew Novecosky.

“When you enter our beautiful school, you enter a space that honours the history of the land and the relationships of all people,” he said, noting that a special place has been prepared for the plaque, featuring a mural painted by St. Mary’s students and staff under the direction of local artist Daniel O’Shea Sanderson.

During the unveiling and smudging of the Treaty 6 medal plaque, Bishop Mark Hagemoen and the school’s Elder, Kohkum Lucille Dorion offered prayers of blessing.

The plaque portrays a treaty commissioner grasping the hand of a First Nations leader. Between them is a hatchet, buried in the ground, signifying peace, and around the two figures are images of the sun and the land, symbolizing the eternal promise of the treaty relationship established to last “as long as the sun shines, the grass grows and the rivers flow.”

Bishop Mark Hagemoen attended the St. Mary Wellness and Education Centre Treaty 6 medal celebration June 8, 2022 in Saskatoon (photos by Kiply Lukan Yaworski, Catholic Saskatoon News).

Saskatoon Bishop Mark Hagemoen and St. Mary’s School Elder Lucille Dorion offered prayers of blessing as the Treaty 6 medal plaque was unveiled. (Photo by Kiply Lukan Yaworski, Catholic Saskatoon News)

Four days of prayer and presence remembering children who died at residential schools

By Bishop Mark Hagemoen's blog

Bishop Mark Hagemoen joined Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish for an opening Mass on the grounds of St. Mary Church in Saskatoon June 2, 2022 to start a second annual four-day memorial wake, held to pray for all those lost at residential schools.

Elders, leaders and volunteers of St. Guadalupe Parish were on hand throughout the event June 2-June 5, to be a prayerful presence for those who stopped by to share and reflect.

Full news article: LINK

 

 

 

Indigenous Pastoral and Lay Leader Ministry Education begins again in fall: registration is now open

By Enriching faith

The next round of four courses begins in September 2022, offered online from 4:15 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Tuesday afternoons

Introduction to First Nations Studies – Course #1 – Sept. 20 to Nov. 15, 2022 – REGISTRATION NOW OPEN (Click here)

Or find more information (Click here)

Reflections from program participants (Click here)

 

The Roman Catholic Diocese of Saskatoon, St. Thomas More College and Greater Saskatoon Catholic Schools present:

 

Indigenous Pastoral & Lay Leader Ministry Education is a continuing education program for Catholic Indigenous and non-Indigenous clergy and lay ministers, led by teams of Indigenous and non-Indigenous instructors, modelling respectful and reconciling relationships. The program is jointly sponsored by the Roman Catholic Diocese of Saskatoon, St. Thomas More College and Greater Saskatoon Catholic Schools.

The Indigenous Pastoral & Lay Leader Ministry Education Program includes:

  • An overview of the features of Indigenous peoples in western Canada, with specific reference to the Saskatchewan context.
  • An overview of the history and features of contact and relationship between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples with specific reference to the Roman Catholic Church experience.
  • Creation of a dialogue between Indigenous and Christian world views.
  • Insight into the history that has shaped the complex nature of the relationships in the present day.
  • Provide mutual sharing and hope for a respectful and harmonious future as children of God, who together seek beauty and good of all.

Why take the program?

  • To participate in a concerted effort to answer the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Call to Action.
  • To learn about the history of the interaction between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Peoples including the impact of Roman Catholic missionaries on Indigenous communities.
  • To discuss areas of culture convergence/divergence.
  • To further Catholic social and moral teachings.
  • ​To support the building of right relationship between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Catholics in Western Canada.

Who should take this program?

  • Clergy
  • Lay ecclesial ministers
  • Catechists
  • Catholic school teachers
  • Youth
  • Family ministry leaders

Schedule and Registration:

NOTE:  Participants completing all four courses will earn an Indigenous Pastoral & Lay Leader Ministry Certificate.

The program sessions for each of the four courses will be offered online only from 4:15 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. (SK time) on Tuesday afternoons. Participants will receive log-in information before the first session.

Each course is 18 hours including out-of-class time commitment to additional reading and course work.

Course 1 (Introduction to First Nations Studies)  – Sept. 20 to Nov. 15, 2022 –  REGISTRATION NOW OPEN

Course 2 (Indigenous-Settler Relationship) – Jan. 10 to March 7, 2023

Course 3 (Introduction to Contemporary Effects of Colonization)  – March 28 to May 23, 2023

Course 4 (Introduction to Reconciliation: The Church and Indigenous Peoples) – Sept. 26 to Nov. 21, 2023

 

The fee is $200 for each course.

Funding assistance and bursaries may be available: Greater Saskatoon Catholic Schools staff can check with GSCS administration; in the diocese of Saskatoon bursaries for both clergy and laity are available – diocesan residents can apply for support through the diocesan Education of Laity Fund: LINK.

For further information, please contact programs@rcdos.ca or 306-659-5831.

Pope Francis will visit Canada July 24-29, 2022

By News
[CCCB – May 13 2022] –  The Vatican announced May 13 that Pope Francis will travel to Canada from July 24 – 29, 2022. The historic visit, focused on Indigenous healing and reconciliation, will be the fourth papal journey to Canada and the first since Saint John Paul II’s last visit in 2002.

 

Find more information and updates at www.papalvisit.ca(English) and www.visitepapale.ca (French).

Given the vast landscape of Canada, the limited time period for the visit and considering the health of the 85 year-old Pontiff, the Vatican has announced that Pope Francis will adopt only three communities as a base for his Canadian visit: Edmonton, Quebec City, and Iqaluit.

The Catholic bishops of Saskatchewan are among those welcoming news of Pope Francis’ visit to Canada July 24-29:

Bishop Raymond Poisson, President of the Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops (CCCB) welcomed the formal confirmation of the visit on behalf of Canada’s Catholic Bishops:

“We are immensely grateful that the Holy Father has accepted our invitation to continue the journey of healing and reconciliation with Indigenous Peoples of this land. In late July, Pope Francis will have the opportunity to visit Indigenous peoples here in their homeland, as he promised when he met them recently in Rome. We pray for the health of the Holy Father as we undertake the intensive planning for this historic visit.”

On April 1, 2022, Pope Francis apologized for the Catholic Church’s role in Canada’s residential school system. The Holy Father expressed “sorrow and shame” for the abuse and lack of respect for Indigenous identities, culture and spiritual values in the residential school system.

The Holy Father’s apology was informed by private encounters between March 28 and April 1 with 32 Indigenous Elders, knowledge keepers, residential school survivors and youth representing the Assembly of First Nations (AFN), the Métis National Council (MNC), and the Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami (ITK).

Given the vast landscape of Canada, the limited time period for the visit and considering the health of the 85 year-old Pontiff, the Vatican has announced that Pope Francis will adopt only three communities as a base for his Canadian visit: Edmonton, Quebec City, and Iqaluit.

The visit to three locations will limit travel for the Holy Father while still allowing an opportunity for both intimate and public encounters, drawing on participation from all regions of the country.

Edmonton is home to the 2nd largest number of Indigenous people living in urban Canadian centres. In addition, 25 residential schools were located in Alberta, the most of any province or territory in Canada.

Iqaluit, with close to 8,000 people, is home to the highest population of Inuit (3,900) of all Canadian cities with more than 5,000 people. Pope Francis was personally invited by Inuit delegates to visit the North during their meetings in March.

Quebec City provides an eastern hub for those who may wish to travel to see Pope Francis, especially Indigenous Peoples of the East. The region is also home to Ste. Anne-de-Beaupré, one of the oldest and most popular pilgrimage sites in North America, drawing Indigenous Peoples and others from throughout Canada and around the world each year.

While dates and general locations have been confirmed by the Vatican, specific sites and a formal program will be developed in dialogue with Indigenous partners at the local and national level. Given the focus on Indigenous healing and reconciliation, the Holy Father is expected to visit the site of a former residential school and other locations of particular significance.

Typically, six to eight weeks prior to a papal visit, a full program and itinerary are released by the Vatican. At that time, the public will have an opportunity to learn more about how they may participate in the numerous events and related activity for the papal visit, along with volunteer opportunities and other relevant details.

The CCCB has appointed Archbishop Richard Smith as General Coordinator for the Papal Visit, to guide this immense undertaking on behalf of the Canadian Bishops. As Archbishop of Edmonton, the archbishop also accompanied Indigenous delegates to the Vatican earlier this year and has long-standing relationships with Indigenous leaders.

Archbishop Smith commented on the appointment: “I am humbled to serve as General Co-ordinator for this historic visit from Pope Francis. I look forward to working with Indigenous Peoples from across this land as well as local, provincial and federal partners as we prepare to welcome the Holy Father and continue to walk together on this important healing and reconciliation journey.”

On April 1, 2022, Pope Francis apologized for the Catholic Church’s role in Canada’s residential school system. The Holy Father expressed “sorrow and shame” for the abuse and lack of respect for Indigenous identities, culture and spiritual values in the residential school system. (Image courtesy of Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops)

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About the Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops

The Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops (CCCB) is the national assembly of the Bishops of Canada. It was founded in 1943 and officially recognized by the Holy See in 1948.

Rooted in Christ