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Kiply Lukan Yaworski

Retraites de Carême, en français – 2021

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Retraites de Carême, en français

Le Conseil pastoral francophone interdiocésain de la Saskatchewan (CPFIS) annonce deux occasions pour participer à des Retraites de Carême en français, en ligne.

Retraite de Carême L’ESPOIR PENDANT UNE PANDÉMIE,

La paroisse des Sts-Martyrs-Canadiens (Saskatoon) vous offre une retraite en personne ou en ligne avec Mgr Albert Thévenot, évêque du diocèse de Prince Albert, le samedi 6 mars de 13 h à 17 h.   Communiquez avec la paroisse pour confirmer votre participation.

Téléphone : 306-665-1829, par texte 306-280-4219 ou par courriel  mhill@rcdos.ca

Votre don aidera à défrayer les dépenses.

Retraite de Carême CHEZ MARTHE, MARIE ET LAZARE

Le Conseil de l’Éducatif de la Foi catholique chez des Francophones de l’Alberta (CÉFFA) a le plaisir de vous inviter à participer à une Retraite de Carême de 4 jours, en français, disponible en ligne, animée par Sr. Catherine Grasswill, Ursuline de Jésus, du jeudi le 11 mars 2021 au dimanche le 14 mars 2021.

Détails et Inscription sur le site web de Star of the North: Retraite de Carême Chez Marthe, Marie et Lazare

https://www.starofthenorth.ca/register/browse/programs-2/event/chez-marthe-marie-et-lazare-225/

Si vous voulez de l’appui financière pour participer à cette retraite en ligne, veuillez communiquer avec direction.cpfis@gmail.com  d’ici le 9 mars 2021.  Le CPFIS remboursera les frais d’inscription pour jusqu’à 10 candidats de la Saskatchewan.

COVID-19 Vaccine information

By Uncategorised

 

Vatican statement on the morality of vaccines: Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith

Morality of vaccines – Vatican statement from the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith

By Uncategorised

The question of the use of vaccines, in general, is often at the center of controversy in the forum of public opinion. In recent months, this Congregation has received several requests for guidance regarding the use of vaccines against the SARS-CoV-2 virus that causes Covid-19, which, in the course of research and production, employed cell lines drawn from tissue obtained from two abortions that occurred in the last century. At the same time, diverse and sometimes conflicting pronouncements in the mass media by bishops, Catholic associations, and experts have raised questions about the morality of the use of these vaccines.

There is already an important pronouncement of the Pontifical Academy for Life on this issue, entitled “Moral reflections on vaccines prepared from cells derived from aborted human fetuses” (5 June 2005). Further, this Congregation expressed itself on the matter with the Instruction Dignitas Personae (September 8, 2008, cf. nn. 34 and 35). In 2017, the Pontifical Academy for Life returned to the topic with a Note. These documents already offer some general directive criteria.

Since the first vaccines against Covid-19 are already available for distribution and administration in various countries, this Congregation desires to offer some indications for clarification of this matter. We do not intend to judge the safety and efficacy of these vaccines, although ethically relevant and necessary, as this evaluation is the responsibility of biomedical researchers and drug agencies. Here, our objective is only to consider the moral aspects of the use of the vaccines against Covid-19 that have been developed from cell lines derived from tissues obtained from two fetuses that were not spontaneously aborted.

1. As the Instruction Dignitas Personae states, in cases where cells from aborted fetuses are employed to create cell lines for use in scientific research, “there exist differing degrees of responsibility”[1] of cooperation in evil. For example,“in organizations where cell lines of illicit origin are being utilized, the responsibility of those who make the decision to use them is not the same as that of those who have no voice in such a decision”.[2]

2. In this sense, when ethically irreproachable Covid-19 vaccines are not available (e.g. in countries where vaccines without ethical problems are not made available to physicians and patients, or where their distribution is more difficult due to special storage and transport conditions, or when various types of vaccines are distributed in the same country but health authorities do not allow citizens to choose the vaccine with which to be inoculated) it is morally acceptable to receive Covid-19 vaccines that have used cell lines from aborted fetuses in their research and production process.

3. The fundamental reason for considering the use of these vaccines morally licit is that the kind of cooperation in evil (passive material cooperation) in the procured abortion from which these cell lines originate is, on the part of those making use of the resulting vaccines, remote. The moral duty to avoid such passive material cooperation is not obligatory if there is a grave danger, such as the otherwise uncontainable spread of a serious pathological agent[3]–in this case, the pandemic spread of the SARS-CoV-2 virus that causes Covid-19. It must therefore be considered that, in such a case, all vaccinations recognized as clinically safe and effective can be used in good conscience with the certain knowledge that the use of such vaccines does not constitute formal cooperation with the abortion from which the cells used in production of the vaccines derive. It should be emphasized, however, that the morally licit use of these types of vaccines, in the particular conditions that make it so, does not in itself constitute a legitimation, even indirect, of the practice of abortion, and necessarily assumes the opposition to this practice by those who make use of these vaccines.

4. In fact, the licit use of such vaccines does not and should not in any way imply that there is a moral endorsement of the use of cell lines proceeding from aborted fetuses.[4] Both pharmaceutical companies and governmental health agencies are therefore encouraged to produce, approve, distribute and offer ethically acceptable vaccines that do not create problems of conscience for either health care providers or the people to be vaccinated.

5. At the same time, practical reason makes evident that vaccination is not, as a rule, a moral obligation and that, therefore, it must be voluntary. In any case, from the ethical point of view, the morality of vaccination depends not only on the duty to protect one’s own health, but also on the duty to pursue the common good. In the absence of other means to stop or even prevent the epidemic, the common good may recommend vaccination, especially to protect the weakest and most exposed. Those who, however, for reasons of conscience, refuse vaccines produced with cell lines from aborted fetuses, must do their utmost to avoid, by other prophylactic means and appropriate behavior, becoming vehicles for the transmission of the infectious agent. In particular, they must avoid any risk to the health of those who cannot be vaccinated for medical or other reasons, and who are the most vulnerable.

6. Finally, there is also a moral imperative for the pharmaceutical industry, governments and international organizations to ensure that vaccines, which are effective and safe from a medical point of view, as well as ethically acceptable, are also accessible to the poorest countries in a manner that is not costly for them. The lack of access to vaccines, otherwise, would become another sign of discrimination and injustice that condemns poor countries to continue living in health, economic and social poverty.[5]

The Sovereign Pontiff Francis, at the Audience granted to the undersigned Prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, on 17 December 2020, examined the present Note and ordered its publication.

Rome, from the Offices of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, on 21 December 2020, Liturgical Memorial of Saint Peter Canisius.

Luis F. Card. Ladaria, S.I.
Prefect

+ S.E. Mons. Giacomo Morandi
Titular Archbishop of Cerveteri
Secretary


[1] Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, Instruction Dignitas Personae (8thDecember 2008), n. 35; AAS (100), 884.

[2] Ibid, 885.

[3] Cfr. Pontifical Academy for Life, “Moral reflections on vaccines prepared from cells derived from aborted human foetuses”, 5th June 2005.

[4] Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, Instruct. Dignitas Personae, n. 35: “When the illicit action is endorsed by the laws which regulate healthcare and scientific research, it is necessary to distance oneself from the evil aspects of that system in order not to give the impression of a certain toleration or tacit acceptance of actions which are gravely unjust. Any appearance of acceptance would in fact contribute to the growing indifference to, if not the approval of, such actions in certain medical and political circles”.

[5] Cfr. Francis, Address to the members of the “Banco Farmaceutico” foundation, 19 September 2020.

Day of Prayer for Reverence for Life – Message from the Bishop 2021

By Letter

Message from Bishop Mark Hagemoen – Click here for PDF

January 7, 2021

Saint André Bessette

Day of Prayer for Reverence for Life: Sunday, January 31, 2021

 

Dear Clergy, Religious, and Lay Faithful of the Diocese of Saskatoon:

The day of prayer for Reverence for Life will be celebrated in the Roman Catholic Diocese of Saskatoon on Sunday, January 31, 2021, providing our faith communities with an opportunity for prayers, reflection and discussion about the value of the precious gift of human life.

Most of the year 2020 was marked by dealing with the terrible scourge of the COVID-19 pandemic – a health crisis that we are still dealing with, although there seems to be a light at the end of the tunnel. In reference to the pandemic, Pope Francis stated recently in Fratelli Tutti,

“ …the pandemic unexpectedly erupted, exposing our false securities. …for all our hyper-connectivity, we witnessed a fragmentation that made it more difficult to resolve problems that affect us all. Anyone who thinks that the only lesson to be learned was the need to improve what we were already doing, or to refine existing systems and regulations, is denying reality.”

Indeed, many things should not go back to the way they were – and one of the things that calls out for change is protection for the unborn and most vulnerable!

Canada continues to deal with the tragic repercussions of the removal of abortion from the Criminal Code. We now mark the 33rd anniversary of the Supreme Court of Canada decision in the Morgentaler case on January 28, 1988, which removed all remaining restrictions on abortion in Canada. Incredibly applauded by many in our society, these moments in our nation’s history hold within them the tragic reality of millions of lost lives.

Victims of abortion include the unborn children who are killed, but also the mothers, fathers and families left wounded after an abortion. The community is also weakened and damaged as the weakest and most vulnerable among us are not valued and protected.

As the Canadian government now moves along Bill C7 which seeks to expand access to doctor-assisted suicide, also known as “MAiD” – the words of the Holy Father only a few years ago ring prophetic:

“The victims of this [throwaway] culture are precisely the weakest and most fragile human beings – the unborn, the poorest, the sick and elderly, the seriously handicapped, etc. – who are in danger of being ‘thrown away’, expelled from a system that must be efficient at all costs.”

In this statement, Pope Francis went on to call forth all people of good will to continue the steady work to turn our culture from one of convenience and short-sightedness, to a cultural movement that seeks – through good will and honest reflection – the realization of a truly human culture. As he states:

“It is necessary to raise awareness and form the lay faithful, in whatever state, especially those engaged in the field of politics, so that they may think in accord with the Gospel and the social doctrine of the church and act consistently by dialoguing and collaborating with those who, in sincerity and intellectual honesty, share – if not the faith – at least a similar vision of mankind and society and its ethical consequences.” (P. Francis’s speech to Dignitatis Humanae Institute Dec. 7, 2013)

Indeed, this effort is at the service of every person on the planet! If we do not engage in calling each other to a greater and fuller humanity, we should then not be surprised at the larger deterioration of a culture of human care and respect.

Today we are more aware than ever of the fragility of environment, and the inter- relationship of all people and all creation. In Laudato Si (June 2015), Pope Francis reminds us that reverence for all human life – especially the most vulnerable and unprotected – cannot be separated from concern and care of creation. As the pope states, “Since everything is interrelated, concern for the protection of nature is also incompatible with the justification of abortion. How can we genuinely teach the importance of concern for other vulnerable beings, however troublesome or inconvenient they may be, if we fail to protect a human embryo, even when its presence is uncomfortable and creates difficulties?” (Laudato Si, #120)

The Holy Father reminds us that inconsistency about care of the human person will affect our stewardship of creation. “When we fail to acknowledge as part of reality the worth of a person, a human embryo, a person with disabilities – to offer just a few examples – it becomes difficult to hear the cry of nature itself; everything is connected.” (LS #117)

As I stated in my letter of last year, current advances in science, genetics and embryology clearly show the distinct humanity of each unborn child, which comes into existence at conception. Each new, distinct human person shares the fundamental human right to life that we as Canadians celebrate and support on so many other fronts. Failing to recognize that right has left our country damaged – not only in the missing and lost lives of millions of unborn children – but in removing ‘the heart’ from our society. Devaluing human life at any age or stage has inexorably led to the legalization and growing acceptance in our country of euthanasia as “Medical Aid in Death”: our lives seem to cease to have meaning and value as we face the fear of not being ‘useful’, or that we are a ‘problem’ to those on whom we rely for care. This loss of ‘heart’ is also the root cause of so many other evils in our midst: poverty, hunger, discrimination, injustice, racism, and violence.

Sisters and brothers, let us respond to loss of heart by holding steady to the hope of the Gospel of Jesus Christ: the Sacred Heart for our world. Let us join together in our common prayer for Reverence for Life on January 31, and throughout this year.

In this Year of St. Joseph, let us also appeal to the earthly father who faithfully and diligently cared for the young Saviour, and who inspires us in the way of always doing the good that should be done in caring for all God’s people entrusted to our care and service.

And may our every action always lovingly affirm the deep and sacred value of every human person. Sisters and brothers, we again pray that as a nation we may re-discover our heart!

Yours in Christ,

Most Reverend Mark A. Hagemoen

Diocesan Prayer – Reverence for Life

Almighty God, giver of all that is good,

we thank you for the precious gift of human life:

For life in the womb, coming from your creative power,

For the life of children, making us glad with their freshness and promise,

For the life of young people, hoping for a better world,

For the life of people who are disabled, teaching us that every life has value,

For the life of the elderly, witnessing to the ageless values of patience and wisdom.

Like Blessed Mary, may we always say “yes” to Your gift.

Help us to realize the sacredness of human life and to respect and cherish it from conception to its natural end.

And bring us at last, O Father, to the fullness of eternal life in Jesus Christ our Lord. AMEN

Diocèse de Saskatoon – Révérence pour la vie

Dieu Tout-Puissant, donateur de tout ce qui est bon, nous te remercions pour le don précieux de la vie humaine:

Pour la vie dans le sein maternel, provenant de ton pouvoir créatif,

Pour la vie des enfants, nous rendant heureux de leur fraîcheur et de leur promesse,

Pour la vie des jeunes, espérant pour un monde formidable,

Pour la vie des personnes qui sont handicapées, nous apprenant que toute vie a de la valeur,

Pour la vie des personnes âgées, témoignant des valeurs intemporelles de patience et de sagesse.

Comme la bienheureuse Marie, puissions-nous toujours dire “oui” à Ton don.

Aide-nous à réaliser le caractère sacré de la vie humaine, à la respecter et à la chérir de la conception à sa fin naturelle.

Et amène-nous enfin, ô Père, à la plénitude de la vie éternelle en Jésus-Christ notre Seigneur. AMEN

 

Diocesan Office of Migration is open for new intakes until Jan. 31, 2021

By Uncategorised

The Roman Catholic Diocese of Saskatoon is a Sponsorship Agreement Holder with the federal government, with a number of spots available for sponsorship in 2021. The diocesan Office of Migration is open for new intake of sponsorship applications until Jan. 31, 2021. For information please contact migration@rcdos.ca

Learn more about refugee sponsorship: Office of Migration web page.

Year of Saint Joseph

By Enriching faith

During this year of St. Joseph, declared by Pope Francis to mark the 150th Anniversary of the declaration of St. Joseph as the Patron of the Universal Church, Bishop Mark Hagemoen has re-consecrated the Roman Catholic Diocese of Saskatoon to St. Joseph during a special Mass Tuesday, Feb. 2 on the Feast of the Presentation / World Day of Consecrated Life.

Letter from Bishop Mark Hagemoen: Consecration to St. Joseph Feb. 2

Statue of St. Joseph and the Child Jesus at St. Paul Co-Cathedral, Saskatoon.

In a letter to the faithful on the Memorial of St. André Bessette (who had a great devotion to St. Joseph), Bishop Mark Hagemoen  said: “Our diocese will join with other dioceses across Canada and in the church throughout the world to re-consecrate the Diocese of Saskatoon to St. Joseph. Please note that there will be a special liturgy of consecration on the Feast of the Presentation of the Lord at a 7:00 p.m. livestreamed Mass on Tuesday, February 2, 2021, at Holy Family Cathedral.”

The video of the celebration can be found on the YouTube channel at www.youtube.com/user/saskatoondiocese (also posted below)

Prayer resources prepared by the Diocesan Liturgical Commission – PDF

Other recent letters from Bishop Hagemoen:

Day of Prayer for Reverence for Life will be held Jan. 31, 2021 – LETTER

Week of Prayer for Christian Unity will be held Jan. 18-25, 2021 – LETTER

 

 

 

 

Advent and Christmas in a time of COVID-19 – video conversations with Bishop Mark Hagemoen

By Enriching faith

Bishop Mark Hagemoen has been speaking to various groups and individuals about the challenges and blessings we are facing this year during the worldwide COVID-19 pandemic.

Bishop in conversation with Catholic youth

Videographer and host Jerome Montpetit of CatChat Ministries presents a videotaped Zoom conversation with Bishop Mark Hagemoen and four Catholic high school students from Saskatoon reflecting on the experience of COVID-19 and the impact of the pandemic on life, especially during this Christmas season.

Diocesan leaders

Bishop Mark Hagemoen of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Saskatoon speaks about this unusual year with Elder Dianne Anderson of Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish, coordinator of prison ministry in the diocese; Donna Rogal, who works in the Marriage Tribunal at the Catholic Pastoral Centre in Saskatoon; Garth McCutcheon, chair of the Parish Pastoral Council for Christ the King Parish in Foam Lake; and retired diocesan priest Fr. Ken Beck of Saskatoon.

Ways in which restrictions are affecting individuals, communities, the elderly, families, the bereaved, prisoners, and ministries in our diocese are explored in this hope-filled conversation.

NET Team – Keewatin-Le Pas

In a recent Zoom conversation, Bishop Mark Hagemoen of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Saskatoon discussed how the COVID-19 pandemic is impacting the Advent of four NET Ministries (www.netcanada.ca) missionaries presently serving in the Archdiocese of Keewatin-Le Pas, in Northern Saskatchewan/Northern Manitoba.

The NET team members speaking with Bishop Mark are: Maria Altamirano of Vancouver; Matthew Bentler of Saskatoon; Jacob Brown of Halifax, and Fernanda Cano of Bridgewater, Nova Scotia.

The team talks about how the pandemic has affected them personally, as well as how the restrictions on gathering have impacted their ministry this year, and what challenges and blessings they are experiencing in this Advent season.

 

 

Diocesan safeguarding action plan – response to charges being laid against priest

By News

The Roman Catholic Diocese of Saskatoon learned Dec. 16, 2020 that police have laid charges against a priest serving in the diocese, Fr. Anthony Atter, who had been serving as pastor of parishes at Lake Lenore, Annaheim and St. Gregor.  The charges relate to sexual abuse of a minor.

As soon as the diocese learned of these charges, Fr. Anthony Atter was removed from ministry, in accordance with diocesan policy.

The diocese will be cooperating fully with police on this matter, and is unable to respond to questions and comments on the case at this time, while it is under investigation and/or before the courts.

“I am sure like all of you, my heart sank upon hearing of another accusation of abuse by one of our priests. This despite all the work and the great steps we have taken over the last while to create safer church communities and eliminate all forms and threats of abuse,” said Bishop Mark Hagemoen in a message to the diocese Dec. 17.

“I realize that each time the terrible crime of sex abuse is reported, victims and their families are wounded again, the vast majority of faithful priests bow their heads in shame, and sincere Catholics, Christians and people of good will, experience shock, sorrow, anger and righteous indignation.

“I wish very much that I could say to you that because of our efforts there will be no more accusations. However, what I can and will say strongly is – as your bishop, I join with the many lay women and men who have contributed hard work and much time to developing our safeguarding action plan to continue our efforts at eliminating all forms of abuse!

“I also commit to honouring complainants, victims and their families, the accused, and in this case the parishes of the communities of Lake Lenore, Annahiem, and St. Gregor – as well as all of our clergy and lay faithful throughout our diocese and beyond – to not jump to conclusions and allow our legitimate frustration and anger to overwhelm the commitment to respect and support the investigative processes of the police and our own diocese to determine guilt or innocence, and the proper response.”

Bishop Hagemoen concluded: “This current allegation of another case of abuse involving one of our families is an occasion to again affirm our commitment to respond to all those who have been victimized and hurt by any person acting in the name of the Church. The Diocese of Saskatoon stands in solidarity with any and all victims and commits to being an instrument of reconciliation and healing. It also commits to building safer churches and stronger communities: the theme of our safeguarding action plan. I join with all our diocese in sharing both pain and strong resolution.”

Dec. 16 Media Release: PDF

Policies and commitments regarding safeguarding – including sexual abuse – can be found on the diocesan website at https://rcdos.ca/our-diocese/safe-environment/safer-church/

Safeguarding Action Plan

As part of an ongoing commitment to safeguarding children, youth and the vulnerable in its churches, the Roman Catholic Diocese of Saskatoon has published a Safer Church, Stronger Communities safeguarding action plan featuring 20 commitments aimed at preventing and responding to abuse by clergy or others in the church.

Download the Safer Churches, Stronger Communities safeguarding action plan: PDF

Reporting abuse: Contact information

The four-page Safer Churches, Stronger Communities action plan reflects the recent work of a diocesan Safeguarding Committee (consisting of eight lay Catholics and one diocesan priest), chaired by Brenda FitzGerald.

The Safeguarding Committee was established by Saskatoon Bishop Mark Hagemoen to review and update the diocese’s long-standing policies related to safeguarding and abuse.

As part of its work, the diocesan Safeguarding Committee has reviewed and updated diocesan policies for ensuring safe church environments, focused on increasing awareness about the impact of sexual abuse on survivors, and clearly outlined steps for handling allegations of serious misconduct — including sexual abuse – by clergy or others working in the church.

 

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Advent and Christmas in a time of COVID-19: a conversation between Bishop Hagemoen and members of the NET team serving in Keewatin-Le Pas

By Enriching faith

 

In a recent Zoom conversation, Bishop Mark Hagemoen of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Saskatoon discussed how the COVID-19 pandemic is impacting the Advent of four NET Ministries (www.netcanada.ca) missionaries presently serving in the Archdiocese of Keewatin-Le Pas, in Northern Saskatchewan/Northern Manitoba.

The NET team members speaking with Bishop Mark are: Maria Altamirano of Vancouver; Matthew Bentler of Saskatoon; Jacob Brown of Halifax, and Fernanda Cano of Bridgewater, Nova Scotia.

The team talks about how the pandemic has affected them personally, as well as how the restrictions on gathering have impacted their ministry this year, and what challenges and blessings they are experiencing in this Advent season.

 

Conversations about “Fratelli Tutti” on fraternity and human friendship – video panel led by Bishop Hagemoen

By Enriching faith

The Roman Catholic Diocese of Saskatoon has launched a video series to assist in reflection about Pope Francis’ latest papal encyclical Fratelli Tutti on human fraternity and social friendship.

The second in this video series features a panel discussion led by Bishop Mark Hagemoen, in conversation with Greater Saskatoon Catholic Schools teacher Celine Cyrenne, Sr. Marta Piano of the Verbum Dei missionary society, and Fr. Stefano Penna, rector of St. Paul Co-Cathedral in Saskatoon.

Find more information and resources about Fratelli Tutti on the diocesan website at: rcdos.ca/fratelli-tutti

Complete letter: FRATELLI TUTTI – The Encyclical Letter of Pope Francis on Fraternity and Social Friendship

Rooted in Christ